What Is Sales Recruitment And Who Conducts It

Recruitment activities are sometimes conducted by the organization itself, or it can be outsourced to an external agency that specializes in sourcing and screening candidates.

The recruitment industry operates through four main types of media: (i) employment agencies, (ii) “head hunters”, usually for executive level sales recruitment roles, (iii) in-house recruitment, usually via an internal Human Resources department, and (iv) passive candidate research firms.

The stages involved in sales recruitment can vary depending on the needs of the organization and the type of sales role in question. Generally, recruitment for most types of jobs involves several steps and includes sourcing candidates by advertising or “head hunting”, followed by screening and selecting candidates using tests and interviews.

Agency Types

There are four main types of agencies who conduct recruitment, with some agencies specializing in certain job markets, for example sales recruitment or hospitality recruitment or secretarial recruitment.

The recruitment agencies are usually paid by the companies wanting to fill a position, and not the candidates.

Traditional Agency

Traditional agencies are also known as employment agencies. Candidates can and do approach them directly, either by responding to an advertised vacancy, or to register onto the agency’s books. Recruitment consultants then work to match their pool of candidates to their clients’ vacant positions.

Those candidates who best meet the selection criteria of the vacancy are short-listed and put forward for an interview with their clients.

Recruitment agencies are usually paid a contingency fee by the client once a recommended candidate accepts a job with the client company.

Typically, the fee is 20% to 30% based on the appointee’s first year base salary and usually comes with some form of guarantee (30 to 90 days is standard). Should the appointee fail to perform or leaves the company during the guarantee period, the agency would normally offer a replacement candidate at no further cost to the client company.

Headhunters

A ‘headhunter’ is a term used to describe a recruiter who seeks out candidates, often when the usual recruitment processes (e.g. advertising through an agency) fails. Headhunters usually have extensive industry experience and source their candidates through their contacts. There are headhunters who specialize in the sales recruitment industry.

However, because headhunters typically charge more than agencies (often more than 30% of the candidate’s annual compensation), they are usually employed to fill more senior sales management and executive level sales roles.

In-house Recruitment

Larger employers often will undertake their own in-house sales recruitment, usually through their human resources (HR) department. In-house HR staff either (i) co-ordinate external recruitment agencies who have been commissioned to find staff for the company, or (ii) conduct the end-to-end recruitment processes themselves, from advertising through to interviewing and hiring.

Passive Candidate Research Firms / Sourcing Firms

These firms conduct research to identify potential candidates and generate information about them. Often these research firms uncover candidates that cannot be found using other, more traditional methods. These firms usually charge a per hour fee or by candidate lead.

Oil Rigs Employment The Truth About Interviews For Oil Rig Jobs

Do you feel stressed when looking for oil rigs employment? It’s natural. No matter how experienced you may be, everyone feels anxious when they have to look for a new job. For many people, the most frightening part of finding a job is the interview itself. And yet, by rights, this should be the least worrying part of your job hunt. This article discusses some facts about the oil rig job interview which should help to remove your interview anxieties.

Once you get your interview, you are well on your way to getting a job. Depending on the state of the economy, for every 5 interviews you attend, you could get up to 3 or even 4 job offers. The simple fact is that conducting interviews is expensive. Employers don’t like it because it takes away productive working time from their senior staff. That’s why most HR departments aggressively examine job applicants prior to shortlisting them for interviews.

In a booming economy, experienced oil rig workers can get job offers from their very first interview. But even in a weak economy, even the most inexperienced candidate for offshore oil rig jobs should receive at least 1 or 2 offers from for every 10 interviews he attends. If you are being rejected for every interview, you may need to consider whether or not you are suffering from self-sabotaging behavior. It is probably a good idea to take time out from your job hunt to seek professional counseling to fix this problem.

Sometimes you can see many advertisements for oil rig roustabout jobs and other offshore drilling jobs, especially in the free-to-use job boards like Monster. So you think you should have a good chance of getting an interview. But when you don’t get any calls, you start to lose confidence in yourself and your resume. Before giving up on working in the oil industry, you should know that many employers sometimes put out fake advertisements of vacancies to find out how easily they can hire new workers. If they find many unemployed workers, they will take the opportunity to pressure their existing workers to accept pay cuts or risk losing their jobs to someone who will work cheaper.

Clearing your interview is the last step to getting hired. So make sure you show the right attitude to your interviewer. You need to that you are tough, independent, have initiative, and are a team-worker. You also need to show the interviewer that you have at least some of the skills needed to work on an oil rig. Even though you have already stated your relevant skills in your resume, the interview is where you convince your future boss that you have some of the needed skills and are able to pick up more of what’s needed.

Interviews for oil rigs employment are stressful. But if you keep the facts above in mind, you should find some of your worries melting away. It is all a numbers game – attend enough interviews and you will definitely get a job.