Supporting Sap Business One If Your Implementation Failed – What To Do Next

This small article is written with the international focus. SAP B1 was initially targeted to small businesses, however its reasonably rich Corporate ERP functionality dictates mid-market user license cost (especially for SB1 professional user, where license is close to k$3 in USA). There is large number of Certified SAP BO consultants on the Corporate ERP consulting market, however in our opinion SAP B1 requires closer attention to such technologies as Crystal Report, SB1 SDK (Microsoft Visual Studio ecommerce programming in C# and VB.Net), SAP Business One Data Transfer Workbench (where you do initial SB1 data conversion from your legacy system, such as MYOB, Peach Tree, Quick Books, Accpac, Great Plains Accounting for DOS, Windows and Macintosh). We do not pretend to be ultimate authority for SAP Business One implementation recovery, however we did the service for numerous companies in the USA, Canada, Brazil, Russia, China. OK, below is our article:

1.Corporate ERP localization dilemma. Typically your problems are related to language translation and the compliance to the local country tax and corporate reporting legislation. SB1 is localized and certified in most of the Globe (probably excluding Arabic alphabet countries). SAP Business One supports Unicode (Chinese, Japanese, Korean). SAP certifies its SB1 application with local tax and government authorities in the countries, where SAP Business One is localized. New SAP Business One version 8.8 is now available on the same flavor for all the countries (while 2007 and 2005 versions were available in A and B flavors, and you had to implement them on different SQL Servers with different code page and language collation). For SB1 8.8 you can deploy SAP Business One system for all your international companies, where SB1 is localized: China, Russia, Korea, Japan, Thailand, Brazil, India, France, UK, etc.

2.SAP B1 implementation recovery service. We saw numerous implementation screw-ups when your company requires challenging technology integrations: ecommerce, barcode scanning and integration, EDI, customizations, Crystal Reporting, deep data conversions from your legacy accounting package to SAP B1. And you have to be tolerant to the consulting industry practices: your generic certified SAP Business One consultant should be good in Corporate ERP presentation, user licenses sale, CPA type of the implementation with reasonable onsite user training, simple initial data conversion (via SB1 Data Transfer Workbench, where you should help your consultant to prepare CSV files, based on DTW CSV templates)

3.SAP Business One Data Conversion Puzzle. Typically here you have the problem with your current SAP Business One Reseller, who has no experience in industry specific data massage and migration from your legacy accounting or Corporate ERP to SAP Business One

4.Do I have to switch out to another SB1 Partner? Yes, this is what you have to do or what is sort of recommended. Your SAP B1 Partner has access to your company record in SAP Portal and it allows your chosen partner to broke for your and sell you new software licenses

5.How to get help? Please, call us 1-630-961-5918, in USA or Canada: 1-866-528-0577, or email us:

Deciding On How To Finance A Franchise Canadian Franchising Business Loan Info On Financing And L

Not only do you want to have a solid plan when you want to finance a franchise in Canada – it sure helps when that plan makes sense for the business financing loan / loans that you need!

We think that most Canadian entrepreneurs who are either first time franchisees or perhaps are adding another location to their business would agree that its not as important as to where the franchise lending and business funding comes from, but that you get the full funding at terms that make sense for you personally .

Let’s examine some of those key decision points and requirements that you need to fulfill a proper franchise financing solution in Canada.

We think that a lot of franchisees are sometimes overly focused on ‘ the interest rate ‘ when they are seeking a franchise loan. That’s human nature we guess, but the reality is that the loan is simply commensurate with your overall credit quality and in line with the types of financing that are out their in the Canadian business financing market – unfortunately that market for new franchisees is somewhat more limited that in the U.S.

In Canada franchises are financed really in only 3 or 4 different manners — actually 5 we could say if you considered financing the whole franchise yourself through personal savings.

While that might seem a good idea we think in many cases it is not for a variety of reasons – i.e. collapsing personal investments and savings and assets when you don’t have to cant be an overall great strategy. We spoke awhile back to a franchisee who had pledged and used all his personal assets to acquire a franchise – business was slow, and he was unable to secure additional outside financing to re- boot the business because all his personal assets were pledged/gone. Bottom line, not recommended!

So the question then becomes as to how you decide to finance a franchise once you have made that acquisition decision. We’d like to share a couple key points. First of all, whether it’s a franchise or any business whatsoever, it’s financed by two guys, debt, and equity; i.e. what you borrow and what you put in yourself. Spend some time determining the optimal mix and you will best be able to gravitate to the right financing strategy.

In Canada these days we see franchisees putting in anywhere from 10 -50% as their personal investment into the business. Whats the perfect number? The reality is there isn’t one, because each business requires a different amount of financing and has a different mix of assets and financing needs. The key assets and financing needs in franchising are all your initial soft costs, such as the franchise fee, and then comes your costs to open the door, often called the ‘ turnkey ‘. That turnkey component consists of equipment, leaseholds and opening working capital.

We spoke of 4 methods of franchise financing in Canada .Those are as follows : Specialized commercial finance firms that have dedicated franchise finance divisions , Equipment financing, Working Capital term loans as a supplement to your overall financing, and finally the BIL/CSBF loan . The latter is the government SBL loan that is used by hundreds, probably thousands of franchisees to acquire their franchise. It only has one or two limitations, one of which is that it caps out at 350k, but that certainly covers a lot of franchises in Canada in different industry segments – examples restaurants, service businesses, etc.

So, today’s bottom line? Simply that spending some quality time early on in the process in understand which of the 4 options makes sense for you is a valuable investment. That time, coupled with your business plan and financial projections will help you ensure that you have the right mix of financing solution, as well as a properly chosen business loan strategy for your franchise.

Speak to a trusted, credible and experienced Canadian business financing advisor on how to best decide which financing mechanism works for you.

Government Business Financing In Canada Canadian Govt Loans Deliver

Government business financing in Canada – While many entrepreneurs have heard of Canadian govt loans they have not fully understood his business finance offering. Let’s ‘ unbox ‘ the program and discuss the merits and applicability of this loan to your business – and that applies to start ups, franchises… in fact any business tha is under the pre-requisite 5 Million in revenues. Let’s dig in

Established by the federal gov’t many years ago the Small Business Financing program is dedicated to helping new , young, and growing businesses access the financing they might otherwise not receive.

The uniqueness of loan is that the majority of the loan is ‘ guaranteed’ to Canadian banks which offer the financing. At the end of the day it’s the govt commitment to encourage Canadian banks to lend to new and smaller businesses. Naturally one of he benefits to the government is the overall economic stimulus in employment, taxes, etc.

In recent years upwards of 7000++ businesses access the loan annually – for billions of dollars. The accessibility of the loan is augmented by the fact that Canadian ‘ bricks and mortar’ branches are on every main street in Canada. (Truth be told the challenge is not finding the right bank, it’s finding the right banker).

The ability to get approved for a govt small business loan in Canada provides realistic access to capital for businesses who otherwise cannot qualify for ‘ traditional ‘ loans. Yet the actual offering of the program is just that – a traditional term loan at attractive rates, great amortizations, and even the ability to pre-pay without penalty.

Many businesses who utilize the loan are either new, or in some cases purchases of businesses, including the very popular ‘ franchise ‘ segment.

The requirements of the loan are pretty basic – the owner must have reasonable good personal credit history, and must be able to contribute a minimum of 10% or more of permanent capital to the financing in question. The loan can only be used to finance 3 separate asset categories – equipment, leasehold improvements, and real estate. (The latter, real estate is rarely used in our experience as commercial mtges are more suited to this type of finance need).

As important to understand what the loan does to is what it doesn’t offer. You cannot use proceeds to refinance existing loans or for working capital/line of credit needs.

Other key aspects of getting approved include a good business plan, a cash flow forecast, and basic info on your business location, previous business experience, etc.

If you’re looking to ‘ unbox ‘ government business financing in Canada seek out and speak to a trusted, credible and experienced Canadian business financing advisor who can assist in making Canadian govt loans a realistic part of your new or existing business venture.

Stan Prokop