Upcoming Publication On Global Golf Industry

Worldwide golf sport and equipments/supplies industry is highly fragmented with largest contribution coming from the US, Japan and some of the European countries. Golf industry has a large number of male participants than female while this trend is slowly changing and increasing number of women are entering into the golf business. India and China are emerging markets for this sport.

Per capita income and demographic trends leave a major influence over golf demand and participation. The US golf industry is one of the largest in the world and has advanced golf facilities. While in recent times, its growth rate is slower than expected because of the high cost involved in the game and present economic conditions of the US does not allow spending much on leisure activities. Golf apparel and accessories segment started gaining popularity due to rising per capita disposable income in all parts of the country. The golf industry, particularly equipment sales, is impacted by the participation rate, especially from a group of core golfers, and also by the number of rounds played.

Within Europe, a major portion of golf demand and supply comes from few countries wherein the UK and Ireland stands on top. The European golf industry is benefiting from rising golf participation rate in the UK and revenues generated from golf tours. A major portion of the demand for golf equipment is coming from Western part of the Europe, while Eastern Europe is also indicating rising interest of population in the sport. Manufacturers of golf equipments have reduced their production estimate for 2012 and 2013 due to falling national income and trade.

Golf industry in Asian region is expanding rapidly with growing income and rising golf tourists. It has been estimated that number of golfers in these regions increasing rapidly and generating need to serve rising number of members. India offers huge opportunities for golf industry with large number of population and rise in foreign tourists arrivals.

The upcoming report on Global Golf Industry, Participation and Growth Forecast will provide a detailed analysis of golf industry development worldwide with focus on Europe and the US markets. The study will include participation trend, impact of economy over golf industry, golf equipments demand and forecasts. The report will also analyze industry trends, macro economy environment and driving forces accounting for change in the industry.
For more information, please contact

Mitigating Seasonal And Temporary Recruitment Risks

In today’s economy, seasonal and temporary staff can be found in audit offices as well as the shop floor and in the ski resort. As companies strive to have the exact amount of people on board to fulfil fluctuating business demand, finding optimal temporary staff has become a priority for many employers. So what are the risks and rewards associated with temporary staff and what steps can organisations take to build a reliable and flexible workforce to meet seasonal as well as ongoing business demands?

According to the latest figures from the International Confederation of Private Employment Agencies (CIETT), the UK has the highest number of temporary workers in Europe, with over 1.3 million temps working in the UK; thats around 5% of the UK workforce.

Since the 1970s, temporary staffing has expanded rapidly to become a significant feature of many national labour markets. Temporary employment, be it seasonal, ad hoc or interim work, is now a permanent feature of the business landscape and for many organisations, it is a form of working that has become integral to business strategy. Indeed, recent research from the University of Manchester has found that the recession has led many firms to have in place a buffer zone of temporary agency workers. During tough economic times, firms may increase the proportion of their workforces which are externally sourced from temporary recruitment agencies as a means of managing the risks of any future recessions. While for most firms, this strategy is a short term one, there is also evidence that it has developed into a longer-term approach to workforce management.

Temporary staff can be quickly deployed to cope with unforeseen demand, cover sickness, holiday absence and maternity leave and provide extra support due to seasonal demand like the Christmas rush or financial year end. During times of recession, using temporary staff also allows organisations, at least in the short term, to avoid the costly need to sack permanent, core members of the workforce.

The use of temporary staff can also help to reduce the fixed costs associated with labour hiring and recruitment. Temporary workers, for example, represent a relatively low cost method of screening for potential permanent employees, monitoring their on their job performance and culture fit. Recruiting permanent staff from a pool of temporary workers enables businesses to try them out for size over a longer period of time than would be possible under most probation schemes. Conversely, for other employers, using temporary staff can be a way of securing additional time to use for searching for permanent employees.
In more recent years, there has also been a rise in the use of independent contractors by organisations. Contract workers provided added flexibility when a company requires it. They can do one off jobs or provide a service which no other member of staff can provide. In many cases, they can often begin work at short notice which helps employers to meet a sudden demand. The added benefit for the employer is that they are not responsible for their PAYE or national insurance contributions.

Clearly, hiring temporary staff offers a number of specific advantages to employers. However, they do come in all shapes and sizes. The good ones can help a company thrive in the difficult times or offer valuable help and support at short notice. The very best temporary workers are often highly motivated, some seizing on the opportunity to gain valuable experience and may see the role as a stepping stone to a permanent position. Others may resent the fact the role is not permanent, they might lack motivation and commitment and could be detrimental to a companys business. At their very worst, a temporary worker may gain employment under false pretences, which potentially could have very serious repercussions.

The organisations which tend to have seasonal peaks and a greater demand for temporary workers, also tend to be organisations where these seasonal or temporary employees are most likely to have close access to customers, either directly (in the case of retail and the hospitality industry) or indirectly (in the case of call centres or financial institutions). In both cases, the implications of placing the wrong person in a temporary job could be severe and have potentially high financial, legal and reputational consequences.
Experian has found that organisations use temporary staff and contractors while largely ignoring or being unaware of the risks. While the timescales associated with recruiting temporary staff are short, this should not be an excuse for not carrying out appropriate background screening on temporary staff. By doing so, these employers are taking massive risks affecting their own organisations and the public at large.
So what are the specific risks and what implications do these have for employers?

Many organisations, which have fluctuating seasonal and temporary demands, employ a significant number of migrant workers. The immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006, makes it a criminal offence to employ someone who is subject to immigration control and who has no permission to work in the UK. In 2009, the UK Border Agency imposed 2,210 civil penalties on employers of illegal workers totalling 22.1m, almost double the number of civil penalties issued in 2008.
With forged identity documents often very hard to spot without specialist equipment or Scotland Yard level expertise, the importance of electronic identity validation and appropriate background screening should not be underestimated when it comes to temporary employees and complying with immigration legislation.

The Corporate Manslaughter Act places a legal obligation on employers to ensure that the staff they employ do not pose a threat to themselves or others. For sectors like retail and hospitality, ensuring that customers have a safe and pleasant experience is critical to their success but dependent on having honest, reliable and trustworthy staff. In order to protect themselves from legal and financial repercussions further down the line, organisations must satisfy themselves that the temporary staff they employ have the appropriate qualifications, a full and valid employment record and no previous convictions.

The possibility of hiring someone who may pose a direct criminal threat may seem rare, but the fact that the value of reported fraud in the UK has increased by 153% since 2003 reminds us how serious a threat this is to UK businesses. The latest figures from CIFAS, the UKs fraud prevention service, show a substantial rise in the number of cases of employee fraud identified in 2009 compared to 2008. CIFAS also reports an increase in the number of cases of employees selling personal data. The implication of this finding is that more staff are being approached by organised criminals and bribed to reveal personal customer data. Indeed, it has been claimed by the police that one in ten of Glasgows financial call centres has been infiltrated by criminal gangs.
Clearly, organisations which hold large data repositories or deal with sensitive financial information are at greater risk from insider fraud. In these days of identity theft, criminals will pay a healthy price for personal information and the temptation for someone in financial difficulties is clear. For these organisations, temporary or contract employees are often the biggest threats when it comes to employee fraud. Generally, they have less to lose, have less loyalty to the company and can also have wide access to sensitive customer information. Fraudsters are also more likely to obtain entry to an organisation through temporary or contracting roles where background screening may be lax or often non-existent.
When it comes to combating employee fraud, these organisations should consider developing an employee screening policy which includes carrying out identity checks, credit checking and criminal record checks specifically on temporary and contract staff and not just those in permanent positions.

Top tips for meeting seasonal recruitment demands and minimising exposure to risk are:
Dont rely on the recruitment agencys screening process – organisations should also undertake internal background screening of temporary applicants
Build a temporary talent bank consider pre-screening a group of recurring seasonal employees who come back during the busy periods
Use background screening to deter timewasters and potential fraudsters – Experians own experience has found that its not uncommon for as many as 15 per cent of applicants to drop out when made aware that a thorough background check is used in the recruitment process
Effective workforce planning – plan well in advance for busy periods and line up a pre-screened workforce that can be called upon at short notice
Outsource the background screening process not only will this save time and money but will also ensure legal obligations are met

Customized Services – Latest Trend in SEO Peterborough Industry

SEO (search engine optimization) has become the need of hour for every business site whether it is small or large size. Doing business successfully in the traditional offline manners has become the matter of past. Today to remain in race, everyone wants maximum exposure to its targeted customer base. Increasing demand of SEO proves that the most business owners have accepted its importance and are satisfied with the results. But it is also a fact that long term results depend upon the right SEO practice applied by the service provider. Therefore, right selection of SEO service provider becomes too much crucial especially if one is located at or around Peterborough. When we start our search for a suitable and reasonable SEO Peterborough service provider, we come across numerous options; everyone has its own attraction. Therefore, -picking up the best SEO Peterborough service’ becomes a tough task for many business owners and professionals.

SEO practices are not bound to any standard working frame. Every projects needs different SEO practices, therefore, one quote received for one project may not be workable for another project. SEO planning is done after analyzing the website’s parameters; therefore, everything that a SEO service provider at Peterborough offers is customized. The positive aspect of this practice is that it allows the web owners to get the services within budget. Total SEO plan can be divided into phases and the owner is free to choose the options to implement SEO practices of either one phase or more phases. In any case, web owner will have to wait for the results because there is no practice that could deliver overnight SEO results. In nutshell, price, while selecting the SEO service provider at Peterborough, becomes a secondary issue.

SEO Peterborough service providers are well familiar of budget limitation of the business owners as well as intensifying competition. Therefore, they suggest short term low budget practices. When you get similar proposals from two or three SEO service providers, it becomes further tough to pick up the best. The best way is to compare the business experience, client base, specialization in SEO practices and team strength. Asking for the references related to your area or trade is also a good practice to verify the claims. Leading SEO Peterborough service providers have online updating system; therefore, you never need to follow up for the updates. Reporting can be fixed weekly or fortnightly basis. Select the one who could customize the SEO project process as per your requirements, ensuring the results.

About the Author:- Jonnie K. Allen is writing articles for googlesolutions, We specialize in Smart business owners prefer seo services uk providers that offer seo reseller service also. seo peterborough, seo cambridgeshire, seo company uk, and many more….

Citation Employment Law Over 300,000 Working Days Lost Due to Disputes Last Year

Disputes with your workforce are both time consuming and costly, not to mention potentially damaging to your business, reputation and productivity.

Having procedures in place to deal with conflicts which may arise with employees will help minimise any cost and potential damage to your business. Conflicts should be addressed and resolved as quickly and amicably as possible.

New figures reveal the number of working days lost through industrial disputes in the UK has rocketed in recent months.

According to the Office for National Statistics, around 374,000 working days were lost during the 12 months leading up to October 2009, with 90 separate stoppages occurring mainly in the public sector.

-Employment disputes and conflicts have a huge impact on small to medium sized businesses, not only financial but they are increasingly more damaging to staff morale and productivity. Creating a culture with open dialogue and issuing employee handbooks and contracts of employment are all steps Citation advise its clients take to create a happy workforce and limit the potential for disputes,- says Andrea O’Hare, Head of Personnel and Employment Law at Citation.

In recent months all organisations have been directly affected by the postal workers’ strikes. These account for the majority of the days lost in 2009, although there were also disputes involving council and transport workers that led to industrial action last year. It is estimated that around 200,000 workers took industrial action during the 12-month period, including 177,000 in October alone at the height of the postal dispute.

Citation can help you limit the soaring solicitor’s fees you are faced with when dealing with an employee dispute. Citation gives you the confidence your business needs to limit any associated damage and follow the correct procedures.

For further information on how we can help contact our Personnel and Employment specialists on 01625 415 500 or e-mail .

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Press release produced and promoted by Hit Search. Find out more about us and our services at http://www.hitsearchlimited.com. Tel: 0845 643 9289

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How To Allocate Retail Loss Prevention

Profit in any business requires an increase in income and decrease in expenditure. The same theory applies to the retail industry. To make profit in retail requires an in increase sales and reduction in shrinkage. This concept has so far been non-existence in the retail industry where the focus has always only been on increase sales and hoping that the problem of shrinkage will miraculously disappear.
Retail shrinkage occurs as a result of poor or non-existent loss prevention policies and procedures. Therefore, it is imperative that any retail organisation that wishes to remain profitable include loss prevention in its standard operational practices.
Loss prevention is the series of activities that are geared towards the reduction or elimination of all potential loss within an organisation. In the past, loss prevention has been confused with security. While security is a part of loss prevention, security is reactive, basically geared towards identifying shoplifters and employees suspected of stealing, loss prevention is centred around all the activities that are responsible for store loss. It can be known loss such as damages, returns and errors or unknown loss such as shoplifting or employee theft. Preventing shrinkage is simple if we understand the sources of the loss. Last year, UK retail industry spent 771 million on loss prevention, despite this spending, retail shrinkage rose by 5.4%. This has remained the story of loss prevention in the UK for many years. Shrinkage reduced by a few percent one year and increase by several percent the following.
What is the reason for this, the answer lies in the way loss prevention funding is allocated. Even though the levels of funding differ from one organisation to the other, the principle remains the same: spending more for less return on investment (ROI).
The Global Retail Theft Barometer report stated that for the 12-months ending June 2009 crime cost UK retailers 4,063 million. This is broken down as follows:
Customer theft 1,767 million (43.5% of all shrinkage)
Employee theft 1,479 million (36.4% of all shrinkage)
Distribution chain theft 175 million – (4.3% of all shrinkage)
Administrative error – 642 million – (15.8% of all shrinkage)
Total Shrinkage – 4,063 million – (100.0% of all shrinkage)

Total loss prevention spending for the same period was 771 million slightly down from the previous year of 785 million.
Broken down as follows:
Contract Security – 270,621,000.00
In-house Security – 162,681,000.00
Security Equipment – 223,590,000,00
Cash Collection – 61,680,000,00
Other LP Spending – 52,428,000.00
However, in this same period, shrinkage as a percentage of sales rose to 1.37% a rise of 5.4% from 2008 figure of 1.30%.
This brings us to the central thesis of this article: Why is retail loss prevention measure ineffective?
The answer lies in the way funding is allocated. To produce the desired result, retailers first and foremost need to determine the source of loss and allocate funding according to the ratio of loss and the ROI.
The below table outlines this point better, it shows last year retail spending on loss prevention and their return on investment:
Measures: Spending: ROI Achieved:
Trained Employees – 6.8% – 50%
Security Personnel – 56.2% – 2%
Security Equipment – 29% – 45%
Signs & others – 8% – 3%
Customer related theft accounts for only 21% of retail shrinkage the remaining 79% can be broken down into cashier cause 32%, followed by general employee cause 24%, receiving 10% and the remaining 13% is the result of damage and error. But the interesting point that needs to be noted is that even though 79% of retail shrinkage in caused by internal activities, retailers spent more on combating customer related theft than on employee cause.
56.2% of loss prevention resources were on security personnel that produced only 2% ROI, 6.8% was spent on staff training that produced 50% ROI. It is not difficult to see why despite the huge spending on loss prevention, retailers have not been able to affect their shrinkage level. There is a direct correlation between loss prevention spending and the ROI. Until such time that retailers get the balance right, loss prevention spending will continue to produce negative result.

How to make loss prevention effective?
The following are measures when implemented can lead to massive reductions in shrinkage levels and increased profits:
Measure the Scale of the Problem
Analysis daily profit and loss report
Complete top management involvement
Create awareness of the problem
Continuous education and discipline of employees
Inspect What You Expect
Set Measurable Targets
Take Advantage Of Technology
Develop the act of flexibility in approach
Change from present paradigm

Loss prevention is a science and like any science, it requires a systematic approach. Loss prevention personnel cannot approach it with cross fingers praying for the best. Gone are the days when retail crime such as shoplifting was seen as teenage leisure activities, or conducted by drug addicts. Many incidents of shoplifting are now carried out by Organised Retail Theft rings with levels of sophistication never before seen in the retail industry. We as loss prevention experts along with law enforcement agencies have to wake up to this fact and try to build our own capabilities to respond accordingly.
Increase sale does not necessarily mean increase profit the quicker retail executives crabs this concept, the sooner they will be making sustainable profit.