Automotive Brands Making Clever Use Of Mobile

Automotive brands making clever use of mobile

According to a study done by ChannelNet there are more than 440 000 mobile sites and 500 000 mobile apps available worldwide with the automotive industry leading the pack and the category for auto parts coming in a close second.

Mobile device usage has seen rapid growth over the last few years, especially in the automotive industry. Mobile devices have made the buying and selling of cars easier than ever and this is proven by the statistics – 38% of all vehicle searches are done via mobile phones.

Having a mobile-optimised website can increase your business visibility and generate leads. Many consumers are looking for information on the go and having an easy-to-use mobile site for your business can increase your competitive advantage.

According to MobileMarketer.com 90% of shoppers end up at a car dealership after doing online research. This emphasizes the importance of focusing your web resources to attract clients for sales. Your websites usability plays an important role in converting leads to clients. Remember, your website in many cases is clients first point of contact with your brand. Easy access to information regarding your business is critical, especially on your mobile website.

According to Quattro Wireless mobile has the reach and the ability to take someone from consideration to purchase. It sure comes as no surprise that various automotive companies are taking advantage of what mobile has to offer, with great success as a result:

Harley-Davidson extends brand loyalty through mobile, using text messaging to inform customers about sales and promotions.

Volkswagen AG (AdMob Case Study) uses mobile marketing aggressively and smartly.

Land Rover used Admob which drove 73% of the traffic to their mobile site. On the mobile website, Land Rover had over 45,000 video views, 7,400 custom wallpaper downloads, 128,000 gallery views, 5,000 dealer lookups, 800 brochure requests, and 1100 and click-to-calls.

Toyotas motion sensitive iPhone App for Hybrid models: The less water you spill out of the glass, the more economical you are driving

Peugeot 3008 global mobile site: Enhanced touchscreen functionality

BMW Mobile Video Companion Ad (Rhythm NewMedia) achieves branding success.

Mobile case study: Jaguar XF Pre-launch (Yahoo!)

Steering Mazda customers (iCrossing)

Read more about these case studies on MMAGlobal.com.

-Breaking into Tour Management

One of the most diverse and multifaceted jobs in the music industry is that of the tour manager. As the person responsible for making sure everything on tour runs smoothly, this position may seem daunting, and it is not for the timid. But, for the right candidate, this can be a very rewarding, unforgettable job. The tasks performed by a tour manager are extremely diverse, and vary from band to band. One tour manager I spoke to described her duties as: “Basically, my job was to manage the band on the road. Anything from babysitting them, making sure they got to their press on time, dealing with managers of clubs, collecting money, handling promotion, driving, finding hotels, and making sure the rooms were ready for us; you do a bit of everything. Also, with smaller bands, I would set up the merchandise, so doing inventory before and after – just taking care of selling their stuff.”

Before we get too far into what the job entails, we should actually discuss getting the gig in the first place. Again, this varies from person to person, but everyone agrees that amazing networking skills are the single greatest asset an aspiring tour manager can have. Speaking from experience: “It all started just with local bands. I went to a show, in my hometown, for a local band that I was friends with. They ended up doing a show with My Chemical Romance, before they were signed, and I had kept in contact with them, so they hooked me up when they were going on tour. Networking is key, though; if you don’t know people in the industry, you can’t be a tour manager.”

Once you’ve landed the job, get ready for the real fun and excitement to begin. Travel is going to be your new middle name, for the next few months. While seeing new cities, meeting new people, and watching amazing shows every night are definitely some of the perks of the job, don’t forget you’re there to work. The band may go out partying after a show, but keep in mind you’re the one who has to be responsible and get them all up and moving, come morning. I asked one tour manager what the most challenging aspect of the job is: “Being on the road for that long of a time, especially, with smaller bands. Being in a cramped van with no privacy, and being away for long periods of time. It’s survivalism, bare necessities, you shower when you can. But on the flip side, that’s my favorite part: seeing different cities and being able to go see good live music every night.”

As far as the economy goes, tour managers need not worry. As long as bands keep on making and performing music, and people keep on listening, then this is one industry that won’t suffer. As one tour manager puts it: “A friend of mine just got into tour managing, and she picked something up pretty fast. Bands are still touring so there’s still a need for it, the same if not more.”

What’s the best advice for all the up and coming tour managers out there?

“Have a passion for it, you can’t do this job without complete passion and hard work. You can always learn along the way. Start as an assistant or merchandise person. With small bands, you’re learning with them, so it’s a nice learning curve you have together. So networking skills are key. Get to know your local bands, go to shows and start talking to people.”

Anger Management Techniques for Teens 3 Great Tips To Deal With Anger

These days, there is a great need for people to learn about anger management techniques for teens. Teenagers today deal with so many personal issues and yet know very little about handling them the right way.

Unfortunately, this lack of knowledge gets them into all sorts of trouble. Teens have the tendency to release all their negative energy onto other people (and even themselves) and do things they later regret.

However, there are better ways to deal with anger, and these three anger management techniques for teens will show you how.

1) Learn to relax.

When you’re angry, everything about you is agitated. Tense. Feeding this agitation will only serve to make you angrier.

In order to prevent the situation from getting worse, calm yourself down. Think of the people who make you happy and feel your body muscles relax.

2) Focus on solving the problem.

One of the most important anger management techniques for teens is to divert the focus on the solution, not the problem.

Don’t let your emotions get the better of you. Instead of focusing on the negative feeling, focus on the possible solutions to the problem. Look at it from a different point of view and try to figure out what you can do to make things better. Do this one step at a time.

3) Find a creative outlet.

If there’s nothing you can do to solve the problem at the moment, find a creative outlet. This is one of the most effective anger management techniques for teens because it does not only help you release aggression in a healthy way; it also paves the way for the discovery of new skills and hobbies. You can try drawing or writing in a journal for starters.

There’s nothing wrong with being angry or even letting it all out. What is important is that you don’t get yourself into trouble for it, and that you express your anger in a healthy way. Hopefully, these three anger management techniques for teens will help you achieve that.

Now you can easily become your own psychiatrist. Discover breakthrough anger management tips to transform the deadly effects of your anger into a stimulating experience at http://www.20daypersuasion.com/ripping-loose.htm

Organic Industry Watchdog FDA Food Safety Rules Threaten to Crush the Good Food Movement

September 19, 2013 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Mark Kastel, 608-625-2042

Organic Industry Watchdog: FDA Food Safety Rules Threaten to Crush the Good Food Movement

New Report Suggests Proposed Rules Could Drive the Nation’s Safest and Best Farmers Out of Business

http://www.cornucopia.org/2013/09/fda-food-safety-rules-threaten-crush-good-food-movement/ CORNUCOPIA, WI: After years of deliberation in Congress, interagency meetings, lobbyist activity, and a never-ending stream of food poisoning outbreaks, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is finally poised to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

However, according to a just released white paper by The Cornucopia Institute at http://www.cornucopia.org/FoodSafety/, the FDA’s draft rules are so off the mark that they might economically crush the country’s safest farmers while ignoring the root threats to human health: manure contaminated with deadly infectious pathogens generated on “factory” livestock farms and high-risk produce-processing practices.

-In response to deadly outbreaks involving spinach, peanut butter and eggs, Congress acted decisively three years ago to pass the Food Safety Modernization Act,” said Mark A. Kastel, Codirector at The Cornucopia Institute, a farm policy research group based in Wisconsin. “Better oversight is needed but it looks like regulators and corporate agribusiness lobbyists are simultaneously using the FSMA to crush competition from the organic and local farming movement.”

Cornucopia’s report closely examines the FDA’s draft regulations (http://www.fda.gov/Food/guidanceregulation/FSMA/ucm334114.htm) for implementing the new food safety law, and a new FDA guidance (http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Eggs/ucm360028) designed to control Salmonella in eggs produced by outdoor flocks. The report concludes that the new proposals would ensnare some of the country’s safest family farmers in costly and burdensome regulations in a misdirected attempt to rein in abuses that are mostly emanating from industrial-scale farms and giant agribusiness food-processing facilities.

Family farm advocates, and groups representing consumers interested in high-quality food, thought they had won a victory when the Tester/Hagan amendment was adopted by Congress exempting farmers doing less than $500,000 in business from the new rules. But Cornucopia’s report suggests the FDA seems more interested in a “one-size-fits-all” approach to food safety regulation.

In reality, the report suggests that small farms are not really exempt. The FDA is proposing that the agency can, without any due process, almost immediately force small farms to comply with the same expensive testing and record-keeping requirements as factory farms.

“In practical terms,” explains Judith McGeary, a member of The Cornucopia Institute’s policy advisory panel and Executive Director of the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance, “the FDA will be able to target small farms one-by-one and put them out of business, with little to no recourse for the farmers.”

The FDA’s economic analysis also shows that farms over $500,000 (still small in the produce industry) will be significantly impacted with some being driven out of business.

“The added expense and record-keeping time will potentially force many small and medium-sized local farms – owner-operated, selling at farmers markets directly to consumers or to local grocers and natural food co-ops – out of business,” Kastel added.

The Institute’s analysis points out that the FDA has wildly inflated the number of foodborne illnesses that originate from farm production (seed to harvest rather than contamination that occurs later in processing and distribution).

It also alleges that the FDA has failed to recognize that specific processed crops such as fresh-cut, or produce grown in certain regions are the genesis of 90% of dangerous outbreaks in fruits and vegetables. In addition to imports from countries like Mexico, where the most recent Taylor Farms Cyclospora outbreak (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/30/business/taylor-farms-big-food-supplier-grapples-with-frequent-recalls.html?_r=0) originated, the evidence indicates that fresh-cut bagged/boxed salad mix and greens, other pre-cut vegetables and sprouts are much more prone to contamination.

“The proposed rule is a mess,” said Daniel Cohen, owner of Maccabee Seed Company, a longtime industry observer. “The FDA has much greater expertise on food safety issues from harvest to the consumer, but focused instead on farming issues from planting to harvest. Limited, modest, and more focused steps to improve on-farm food-safety could have produced simple, affordable, effective, and enforceable regulation.”

According to Cornucopia, the most important lost opportunity in the collaborative process between Congress, the FDA and the USDA is the lack of attention directed at the giant concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs (factory farms) raising livestock. The massive amount of manure stored at these factory farms is commonly tainted by highly infectious bacteria that have been polluting America’s air, water and farmlands.

“Federal regulators propose nothing to address sick livestock in animal factories and their pathogen-laden manure that is contaminating surrounding rural communities, nearby produce farms and our food supply,” Kastel lamented.

No More Organic Eggs?

The 2010 salmonella outbreak in eggs, centered in Iowa, shone a spotlight on industrial-scale egg houses confining thousands of hens in filthy and dangerous conditions.

The salmonella outbreak led to comprehensive regulation and new guidance for organic farmers. Organic farmers are required by federal law to provide outdoor access to their hens and the new FDA guidance, according to Cornucopia, materially undermines this management practice. And they are doing this despite scientific evidence tying higher rates of pathogenic contamination to older, massive factory farms with cages and forced molting (practices banned in organics) rather than raising birds outside.

“Their new guidance, on one hand, will make it difficult, expensive and maybe even impossible to have medium-sized flocks of birds outside,” Kastel stated. “At the same time, the FDA has colluded with the USDA’s National Organic Program to say that tiny ‘porches’, which hold only a minute fraction of the flock, will now legally constitute ‘outdoor access.’ This is a giveaway to conventional egg companies that are confining as many as 100,000 birds in a building and calling these ‘organic.'”

The Cornucopia Institute has publicly stated that they are investigating legal action against regulators if enforcement action is not taken, under the Organic Foods Production Act (http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC50603700), against the large industrial operations confining laying hens and broilers indoors.

The issue of food safety in Washington has been a contentious one, causing rifts even between nonprofits representing the interest of consumers and family farm organizations that have been historically aligned in support of organic and local food. Some consumer advocates pressed for no exemptions, even as farm policy experts have supplied evidence indicating smaller, family-operated farms are inherently safer.

“Only an idiot would not be concerned with food safety,” said Tom Willey, a Madera, California, organic vegetable producer and longtime organic advocate.

Added Willey: “The antibiotic resistant and increasingly virulent organisms contaminating produce, from time to time, are mutant creatures introduced into the larger environment from confined industrial animal operations across the American countryside. The FDA’s misguided approach could derail achievements in biological agriculture and a greater promise of food made safe through respect for and cooperation with the microbial community which owns and operates this planet upon which we are merely guests.”

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The Cornucopia Institute is a nonprofit organization engaged in research and educational activities supporting the ecological principles and economic wisdom underlying sustainable and organic agriculture. Through research and investigations on agricultural and food issues, The Cornucopia Institute provides needed information to family farmers, consumers, stakeholders involved in the good food movement, and the media.

Panasonic Enters Into Supply Agreement With Tesla Motors To Supply Automotive

If the laptop is the built-in optical drive, you generally use the IDE interface, if it is external, then there are USB, PC Card, IEEE1394, and four special interface. Which is the general level of the best USB interface, but not all USB drives can boot laptop, the best way is the actual experiment. There are several criteria that will be able to boot USB plug-in optical drive, such as IBM Slim USB CD-ROM, but the price is not cheap:). Note that: USB interface, CD-ROM boot, can only be used to install Windows XP, Windows XP if the previous operating system (such as Windows 2000, and 98, ME), may be found in the boot drive, you must use special The boot image can burn a disc,
Laptop PANASONIC CF-30 Battery generally support network boot, of course, some domestic models (such as most of the SONY machine) do not support, if it is supported by the machine, press F12 at startup can display Network Boot, as long as your network environment supports network boot ( For example, install a version of Windows2000 Server with Terminal Services), you can use this option.
To prevent dust pollution, notebook drives should be removed when not in use the disc tray closed, but be careful not to use too much low-quality discs.
When the notebook computer when the drive head with dust, you should use a special detergent to clean the head, it is not the time, you can … … can use a little saliva (remember to brush our teeth, do what the saliva inside with rice … … ha ha) and a cotton swab to clean, the effect is also very good. Laptop optical drive tray out of the sides with the guide, if too much force when loading the disc, much easier to increase the number of rail and tray wear,
Long placed the notebook computer batteries, customers need not worry will lead to shortened battery life. When the battery charge to 100%, the charge control chips (FET) will stop charging the battery. Subsequently, the battery power will be reduced in the course of nature. When the battery down to 95%, FET will re-trickle charge the battery until the battery back to 100%. This product is designed to extend the natural life of the battery, so keep the PANASONIC CF-31 Battery placed in the notebook computer does not affect the battery’s natural life. Pull down is also possible to use you, but remember to pray Do not plug power with the kick off, oh.
It is a powerful endorsement of our technology that Panasonic, the worlds leading battery cell manufacturer, has chosen to partner with Tesla to advance electric vehicle performance and value, said Tesla Co-Founder and CEO Elon Musk. Incorporating Panasonics next-generation cells into Model S batteries will ensure unrivaled range and performance. We are very grateful for our great partnership with Panasonic.
Panasonic will supply lithium ion cells for EVs that can achieve longer range with large energy density. It is our pleasure to start supplying the cells for Teslas Model S and promote sustainable mobility, said Masato Ito, President, Energy Company of Panasonic Corporation.
Tesla is a supplier of batteries and powertrains to Toyota and Daimler. Tesla is a comprehensive electric vehicle powertrain component supplier to the electric vehicle industry.
Forward-Looking Statements
Certain statements in this press release, including statements regarding vehicle cost, margin targets and range and performance metrics for Model S, are forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are based on managements current expectations, and as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, actual results may differ materially from those projected. Various important factors, such as the following, could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements: finalization of pricing and costs from suppliers, consumer demand for electric vehicles; achieving expected results from powertrain PANASONIC CF-53 Battery systems as well as the risks and uncertainties identified under the sections captioned Risk Factors and MD&A in Teslas Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on August 12, 2011. Tesla disclaims any obligation to update information contained in these forward-looking statements.