What Are The Practical sources Of Energy Part 1

What Are The Practical sources Of Energy? Part 1

The practical sources of energy include the fossil fuels, natural gas, petroleum (or oil), and coal. Fossil fuels are referred to as nonrenewable energy sources because, once used, they are gone. Scientists are exploring the practicality of other sources called renewable energy sources. These include sun, wind, geothermal, water, and biomass. The renewable energy resources are important in long range energy planning because they will not be depleted.

Natural Gas

Sometimes natural gas is confused with gasoline, the fuel in cars. They are not the same. Gasoline is a mixture of liquids, and natural gas is mainly methane and is piped into homes and office buildings where it is used as an energy source for heating, cooking washing, and drying. It is raw material to make other chemicals, and is the cleanest bumming fossil fuel. This means it contributes little environmental pollutants when bummed.

Petroleum or Oil

This is the black, thick liquid pumped from below the earth’s surface wherever you see an oil rig. To make it useful, it is refined. Refining separates the gasoline portion which is used in transportation. Products from the remaining portions include synthetic rubber, detergents, fertilizers, textiles, paints, and pharmaceuticals.

Geothermal

Geothermal energy refers to the energy deep within the earth. It shows itself in the fountains of boiling water and steam known as geysers. Geothermal energy was generated by the decay of natural radioactive materials within the earth. In addition it is the heat energy remaining within the earth from gravitational formation of the earth. This energy source is not popular in the United States, but Yellowstone has some geysers. Geothermal energy is used to heat some homes, greenhouses, and factories. The actual usable geothermal sites are few, but is considered a renewable energy source.

Coal

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel. It is not a widely used energy source due to the cost of mining and its impurities, which cause pollution (acid rain). There are two ways to mine coal; underground mining and strip mining. Disadvantage to these methods is the environmental change caused in the process. New ways of using coal are being explored, such as liquefication, in which a product similar to oil is produced.

Solar

The sun is 93 million miles away and yet, this ball of hot gases is the primary source of all energy on earth. In the hi ugh temperature of the sun, small atoms of hydrogen are fused, that is, the centers of the two atoms are combined. Fusion releases far greater energy than splitting the atom (fission, see below). Without sunlight, fossil fuels could never have existed. The sun is the supplier of energy which runs the water cycle. The uneven heating of the earth produces wind energy. Solar energy can be used to cook food, heat water and generate electricity. It remains the cleanest energy source an it is renewable. It is the hope for the energy source of the future and scientists at NREL are actively working on ways for solar energy to supply more our energy needs!

Where will they put LED automotive lights next

Weve seen LED lights added to automobiles in a number of ways that werent so strange. But, LEDs are about to enter the world of oddity, replacing nearly every illuminating part of your car. Where will they go next? And what function will they serve? Lets explore the growing world of automotive LEDs.

LED lights first made automotive appearances in small doses many years ago, replacing alarm lights and stereo displays. Since then, LEDs have grown to replace entire tail light assemblies, running lights, and many other automotive lighting applications. Some of the new LED implementations look great. Theyre much sharper than large and ugly red reflectors. Plus, they draw much lower than standard bulbs and last significantly longer. Other implementations, though, are flat-out tacky.

Some automotive LED uses that make gearheads cringe include the fresh selection of LED trinkets at the local auto parts store. This includes LED rearview mirror backings, LED exhaust tips, LED mood lighting, and LED side view mirror illumination rings. In fact, they even sell random LED light strips for car owners to place anywhere they choose (these frequently become LED ground effects and trailer running lights). The king of LED tack is the newly popular strip of lights tacked beneath the tailgate of a truck. Yuck.

One of the latest LED automotive trends that isnt so offensive is replacing the stock third brake light with an updated LED model. This swap is growing in popularity because its an easy switch (just turn a couple of screws and plug in a couple of wires and youre done). Also, most factory third brake lights look like theyre straight out of the 70s. Massive red reflectors, bulky shapes and big cargo lights look great when replaced by the look of a clear LED 3rd Brake Light. Officially, this LED light replacement gets the thumbs-up here.

In the future, speculation has LED light technology replacing automotive headlights altogether. Automakers have keyed on the dropping price of this technology, the growing illumination power, the long lifespan, and the reduced load they place on the battery. Full LED lighting could be the way of the future for electric vehicles as well, as every ounce of power matters when youre running on batteries only.

Accepting LEDs as a fact of automotive life is a must. But, how theyre used doesnt always have to be tolerated. Because the dropping price of LED technology is creating a festering brood of bright bric-a-brac, gearheads need to watch out for growing trends that need to be snuffed out. Before we get the rolling equivalent of Fremont St. in Las Vegas, auto enthusiasts need to unofficially enforce an LED code of conduct. Together we may be able to prevent an infestation of tackiness.

Commercial Remodeling Guidelines For Retail Stores

A successful commercial remodeling project should make the retail location look more attractive and welcoming, while also increasing efficiency and comfort for employees. If you are giving your retail space a facelift, consider the following tips to help you give your location a leg up on the competition.

Find a Reliable Contractor
Remodeling takes away from the time your store is open to customers, so it’s crucial to hire a contractor who meets deadlines. Additionally, look for commercial construction contractors that are licensed, bonded, and insured. Do not be afraid to ask a contractor to meet with you before you make a final hiring decision. If a contractor does not arrive to a preliminary meeting on time, you may have good clue about what working with him will be like.

Make a Great First Impression
First impressions are important, especially for retail stores. Aim for a look that intrigues and welcomes customers. To make your customers feel safe, create a layout that allows a visual scan of the entire store upon entrance. Further enhance the customer experience with shelving units that are not too tall, aisle spaces that are comfortably wide and merchandise that is beautifully arranged in a logical manner.

Use Light to Your Advantage
Lighting can create a certain mood and spotlight products you want to accentuate. Consider using low ambient light with track lights to point customers to featured merchandise. To create a relaxed mood while complementing products, build lights into shelves and custom cabinets.

Paint According to Your Goals
Different colors trigger different emotions. For example, the color orange makes most people feel cheerful. Paint your retail space in a color that will help you achieve your commercial goals.

If you own a bakery, it would be wise to choose the color red, which is known to make individuals feel hungry. Green is a color that can trigger emotions such as growth, health and hope–great for a location that promotes wellness or sells plants. The color blue promotes the feeling of love, tranquility, acceptance and understanding–perfect for a retail store that sells spa products or gifts. Yellow is known to boost a customer’s memory and can help them feel joyful, smart and organized–ideal for a store that sells stationery products or organization solutions. Use colors to produce emotions that complement your product line.

Remodel to Enhance Your Brand
Northwestern University professor of marketing Philip Kotler has written, “In some cases, the place, more specifically the atmosphere of the place, is more influential than the product itself in the purchasing decision.” In this way, retail remodeling can enhance your brand.

Retail space remodeling can be an intimidating process. However, as providers of Portland remodeling services, we here at Sitka Projects can say that retail owners who plan carefully achieve excellent remodeling results. Knowing your target audience and having a firm grasp on your goals for the customer experience are the first steps in making a mediocre retail space explode with life.

Best Legal Advice Warranted For Employment Tribunals

Many states are coming up with their independent employment tribunals as part of rapid dealing with cases related to jobs and such circumstances. Tribunals have been resorted to by many governments, both at the local centres and also at the state levels. These are courts which deal with matters of governance and of civil nature, but mostly their functions are to hear out cases which can be dealt without having a jury or long trials. Tribunals are usually meant to expedite civil cases, which are concerned with administrative matters. Judges sitting in chair in employment tribunals are either specially deputed from the regular courts or have special expertise in administrative cases.

Whenever employment related issues are to be brought into the court of law, it is seen that tribunals are the best places to go because the final word can be received quickly. If an applicant is not satisfied with the results, then the case can be taken to the higher levels. But if things are alright for them, then it is very easy and even productive to start at the very beginning. Since special cases are only heard in these tribunals, not every lawyer or solicitor would be able to handle the cases.

Further, general public is totally unaware about the proceedings inside the court room. For this reason, legal advice is highly essential whenever matters of employment are brought before the employment tribunals. Lawyers can be contacted when these kinds of cases are forthcoming. People can approach solicitors of repute, who have been handling the cases and have the necessary expertise to give them legal advice. Many people are there, who are not in the knowledge of such specialised lawyers.

To get more information on them, people should ask about in the court or their lawyer friends to suggest the name of the right solicitors for them. With the right kind of advice on legal matters, clients can be sure of getting a reprieve in their cases, or at best they will have a proper representation in the court of law. During any problem that arises in case of employment or in offices or work related environment, aggrieved persons can go for the employment tribunals, through the employment lawyers or solicitors.

It has become customary nowadays, much because of the fact that people are becoming aware about their rights and also because there are plenty of experts who can provide legal advice on matters related exactly to employment. These are people who have had specialisation of employment and labour laws in their courses or have been practising the same in courts for many years now. Taking advice about matters pertaining to employment tribunals is therefore the usual method to start of a case these days, so much so that employment related lawyers are beginning to go for these features by getting the proper mileage and advertisement.

Proving Race Discrimination In Employment

Direct race discrimination is when an organisation (or an employee of the organisation) treats a person less favourably than someone else on racial grounds. Proving direct race discrimination is not trivial. The burden of proof is on the employee alleging the discrimination. The UK landmark case of Chagger v Abbey National plc & Hopkins of 2006, where the Employment Tribunal’s finding of race discrimination led (after Abbey National’s refusal to comply with the Tribunal’s order to re-instate Mr Chagger to remedy its wrongdoing) to the record 2.8 million compensation order, serves to illustrate the burden of proof in race discrimination. Abbey National (being re-branded as Santander from 2010 and being part of the Banco Santander Group) employed Balbinder Chagger as one of its two Trading Risk Controllers, both managed by Nigel Hopkins. Mr Chagger was of Indian origin. He earned approximately 100,000 per year. Abbey National dismissed him in 2006, apparently for reasons of redundancy. The redundancy pool of selection was he and the other Trading Risk Controller, a white female.

The employee alleging the race discrimination must prove that his employer, on the balance of probabilities, discriminated against him on racial grounds. On the balance of probabilities means that the alleger needs to prove that it is more likely than not that the employer treated him differently on the grounds of his race; the alleger does not need to prove with absolute certainty that the employer discriminated.

The alleger must prove that he was treated less favourably than someone else (preferably a real comparator, but it could also be a hypothetical comparator) on the grounds of race. This can often be very difficult because the employer will almost always deny that the alleged discrimination had anything to do with race.

Mr Chagger established a case based on facts suggesting there had been race discrimination. The Employment Tribunal found that Mr Chagger had been selected for redundancy and had been dismissed and that a real comparator (the other Trading Risk Controller) had not. The Tribunal noted that there was a difference in race, colour and ethnic origin between Mr Chagger and the comparator. The Tribunal noted the following: Mr Chagger’s selection for redundancy was grossly unfair; Mr Hopkins had predetermined that Mr Chagger would be the employee that would be selected for redundancy; Mr Hopkins had used the redundancy selection process as a means to remove Mr Chagger from his position; Mr Hopkins had reduced Mr Chagger’s redundancy scores on matters which no reasonable employer would have taken into account; Abbey National provided no Equal Opportunity training for any of the managers it assigned to hear and decide on Mr Chagger’s issues and complaints of race discrimination; Abbey National failed to answer Mr Chagger’s Race Relations Act Questionnaire; and Abbey National was in breach of the statutory Code of Practice on Racial Policy in Employment by failing to carry out monitoring, failing to take allegations of race discrimination seriously, and failing to investigate them promptly.

If the alleger can establish a case based on facts suggesting there has been race discrimination, then the burden of proof could shift to the employer to prove otherwise. The employer will then be burdened with the task of having to prove that it would have treated in a similar way someone else who was not of the same racial group as the alleger. If the employer does not have any non-discriminatory explanation, or if the Tribunal finds the explanation inadequate or unsatisfactory, then the Tribunal must infer discrimination on racial grounds.

The Tribunal was satisfied that, on the balance of probabilities, Abbey National and Mr Hopkins had discriminated against Mr Chagger on the grounds of race in respect of his dismissal. The Tribunal, therefore, passed the burden of proof to Abbey National and Mr Hopkins to show that there was no discrimination whatsoever in respect of Mr Chagger’s selection for redundancy and dismissal.

The employer will almost always deny that the alleged discrimination had anything to do with race. The explanation that Abbey National and Mr Hopkins put forward was that the selection for redundancy and dismissal was carried out fairly. The Tribunal rejected this explanation for the factors listed above. Abbey National then put forward an alternative explanation, that Mr Hopkins and Mr Chagger could not have had any reasonable working relationship (that is, the difference in treatment suffered by Mr Chagger was for a reason other than racial grounds). The Tribunal could not rely on this explanation; it was an explanation that Mr Hopkins himself did not accept.